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Difference-Between-Replication-Bubble-and-Replication-Fork-Replication-Bubble-vs-Replication-Fork

Difference Between Replication Bubble and Replication Fork | Replication Bubble vs Replication Fork


 Key Difference – Replication Bubble vs Replication Fork

 

Replication bubble and replication forks are two structures formed during the DNA replication and the key difference between Replication Bubble and Replication Fork is that the replication bubble is an opening present within the DNA strand during the initiation of replication while replication forks are structures present in the replication bubble that denote the actual occurrence of replication.

In the context of molecular biology, DNA replication is a process where two identical copies of DNA are produced from a DNA molecule. This biological process is the basis of continuity of all life forms and biological inheritance. DNA replication occurs in all living organisms. Replication process consists of different techniques, enzymes, biological compounds, and replication structures that are being established to initiate replication and to process it. The replication bubble and replication forks are such structures that are formed during DNA replication. Both replication bubble and replication fork are present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

CONTENTS

1. Overview and Key Difference
2. What is Replication Bubble
3. What is Replication Fork
4. Similarities Between Replication Bubble and Replication Fork
5. Side by Side Comparison – Replication Bubble vs Replication Fork in Tabular Form
6. Summary

What is Replication Bubble?

DNA replication is a process where a DNA molecule replicates and makes a copy of itself. The replication bubble is considered as the opening that is present within the DNA strand during the initiation of replication. The formation of replication bubbles varies in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Prokaryotes contain a single replication bubble while eukaryotes contain multiple replication bubbles.

The replication bubble has the ability to grow in two directions due to the presence of replication forks. In each replication bubble, there are two replication forks. This is the point where the parental DNA double helix splits. In the context of eukaryotic organisms, they contain a true nucleus. The eukaryotic DNA is linear. Due to this reason, the replication occurs at multiple locations that results in the presence of multiple replication bubbles.

The functioning of the replication bubble occurs with the enzyme DNA helicase that breaks the hydrogen bonds present between the nitrogenous bases of the two parental DNA strands. Single Strand Binding Proteins are attached to the separated parental DNA strands to prevent the reformation of hydrogen bonds.